Showing the state of our nation in the light of God’s Holy Word

THE ENTRANCE OF THY WORDS GIVETH LIGHT

“The entrance of thy words giveth light.”

Psalm 119:130

The blessed Spirit is pleased sometimes to give some testimony concerning Jesus; to open up some passage of Scripture which speaks of Jesus; to cast a divine light before the astonished eyes; and to throw some of the blessed beams of gospel truth into our souls; whereby we see Jesus. We are brought sometimes in soul feeling to the desires of those Greeks who came up to worship at the feast, and went to Philip, saying, “Sir, we would see Jesus,” and from some apprehension of His beauty and loveliness, we pour out our soul before God, and say, “We would see Jesus.” We want to feel his love; to have our eyes anointed to behold His glory; to look upon Him as crucified for us and bearing our sins in His own body on the tree; that we may have a sweet and blessed fellowship with Him as our suffering Surety, and thus, by faith, enter into the length and breadth and depth and height of that love of His “that passeth knowledge.” Wherever there is a work of grace upon the soul, there will be this pining after Christ.

The soul that is really taught of God can never rest satisfied short of Jesus. “There remaineth a rest to the people of God,” and they can never be satisfied short of that rest, which consists in an experimental knowledge of the Son of God, as revealed by the Holy Ghost to their souls. But before the enjoyment of this spiritual rest, there is often long delay; clouds of darkness for months and years together often envelope the mercy-seat; the cross of Christ cannot be seen; the Holy Ghost does not fulfil His covenanted office in taking of the things of Christ and showing them to the soul; and in the absence of these heavenly manifestations, we cannot realise our interest in the things of salvation, nor can we feel our hearts sweetly composed and settled down in the blessed assurance, that when this life shall come to a close, we shall inhabit mansions prepared for us before the foundation of the world. When “with clouds he covereth the light, and commandeth it not to shine by the cloud that cometh betwixt,” there are many doubts and fears, suspicions, surmises, and jealousies whether we are not deceived and deluded altogether.

At such seasons, everything seems to be against us, and to stamp us as being nothing but nominal professors. It is in such dark and gloomy seasons as these that “the entrance of God’s words giveth light.” For instance, some such promise as this is made sweet to the soul: “Come unto me, all ye that labour and are heavy laden, and I will give you rest.” As that promise is brought home with power to the heart, and is shed abroad with some sweetness in the soul, it draws forth and strengthens faith, and the toiling pilgrim comes to the Lord, feeling himself “weary and heavy laden,” and as he comes, he is indulged sometimes with a few sweet moments of rest. He is enabled to look out of fallen self, with all its miseries, and to look upon Jesus in His grace and beauty. He is favoured to cast himself simply, as he is, upon Jesus, and some sense of His atoning blood, dying love, and complete propitiation for sin is opened up to his heart. Faith springs up to lay hold of and embrace it, and he begins to taste the savour and sweetness and healing efficacy of a Saviour’s blood and love. Thus “the entrance of God’s words giveth light,” and he feels by the Divine coming in of what God has externally revealed, that inward light is shed abroad in the recesses of his soul, and he can, in some measure, realise the power of the cross of Jesus in his heart.

J. C. Philpot (1802 – 1869)